Some Don Quixote Quotes (3-13-2013)

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This blog is still under construction. The list of quotes below is going to be pared down quite a bit.

Some Don Quixote Quotes

Some Notable Quotes by the Man from La Mancha! from GoodReads.com

Don QuixoteDon Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
60,200 ratings, 3.79 average rating, 2,632 reviews
buy a copy

Don Quixote Quotes (showing 1-30 of 89)
“Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“All I know is that while I’m asleep, I’m never afraid, and I have no hopes, no struggles, no glories — and bless the man who invented sleep, a cloak over all human thought, food that drives away hunger, water that banishes thirst, fire that heats up cold, chill that moderates passion, and, finally, universal currency with which all things can be bought, weight and balance that brings the shepherd and the king, the fool and the wise, to the same level. There’s only one bad thing about sleep, as far as I’ve ever heard, and that is that it resembles death, since there’s very little difference between a sleeping man and a corpse”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quijote de La Mancha
“Es natural condición de las mujeres desdeñar a quien las quiere y amar a quien las aborrece”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quijote de La Mancha
“I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1
“El que lee mucho y anda mucho, ve mucho y sabe mucho.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraEl Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha
“Thou hast seen nothing yet.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“There is no book so bad…that it does not have something good in it.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Destiny guides our fortunes more favorably than we could have expected. Look there, Sancho Panza, my friend, and see those thirty or so wild giants, with whom I intend to do battle and kill each and all of them, so with their stolen booty we can begin to enrich ourselves. This is nobel, righteous warfare, for it is wonderfully useful to God to have such an evil race wiped from the face of the earth.”
“What giants?” Asked Sancho Panza.
“The ones you can see over there,” answered his master, “with the huge arms, some of which are very nearly two leagues long.”
“Now look, your grace,” said Sancho, “what you see over there aren’t giants, but windmills, and what seems to be arms are just their sails, that go around in the wind and turn the millstone.”
“Obviously,” replied Don Quijote, “you don’t know much about adventures.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Remember that there are two kinds of beauty: one of the soul and the other of the body. That of the soul displays its radiance in intelligence, in chastity, in good conduct, in generosity, and in good breeding, and all these qualities may exist in an ugly man. And when we focus our attention upon that beauty, not upon the physical, love generally arises with great violence and intensity. I am well aware that I am not handsome, but I also know that I am not deformed, and it is enough for a man of worth not to be a monster for him to be dearly loved, provided he has those spiritual endowments I have spoken of.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote Part 1 Of 2
“There were no embraces, because where there is great love there is often little display of it.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Hunger is the best sauce in the world.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Demasiada cordura puede ser la peor de las locuras, ver la vida como es y no como debería de ser.Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“A bad year and a bad month to all the backbiting bitches in the world!…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“… he who’s down one day can be up the next, unless he really wants to stay in bed, that is…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Truly I was born to be an example of misfortune, and a target at which the arrows of adversary are aimed.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“What man can pretend to know the riddle of a woman’s mind?”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Here lies a gentleman bold
Who was so very brave
He went to lengths untold,
And on the brink of the gave
Death had on him no hold.
By the world he set small store–
He frightened it to the core–
Yet somehow, by Fate’s plan,
Though he’d lived a crazy man,
When he died he was sane once more.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Translating from one language to another, unless it is from Greek and Latin, the queens of all languages, is like looking at Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, for although the figures are visible, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and cannot be seen with the smoothness and color of the right side.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“The wounds received in battle bestow honor, they do not take it away…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“It’s up to brave hearts, sir, to be patient when things are going badly, as well as being happy when they’re going well … For I’ve heard that what they call fortune is a flighty woman who drinks too much, and, what’s more, she’s blind, so she can’t see what she’s doing, and she doesn’t know who she’s knocking over or who she’s raising up.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“All of that is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but we cannot all be friars, and God brings His children to heaven by many paths: chivalry is a religion, and there are sainted knights in Glory.’Yes,’ responded Sancho, ‘but I’ve heard that there are more friars in heaven than knights errant.’That is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘because the number of religious is greater than the number of knights.’There are many who are errant,’ said Sancho.Many,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but few who deserve to be called knights.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Muchos son los andantes,” dijo Sancho.
Muchos,” respondió don Quijote, “pero pocos los que merecen nombre de caballeros.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraEl Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha
“I was born free, and that I might live in freedom I chose the solitude of the fields; in the trees of the mountains I find society, the clear waters of the brooks are my mirrors, and to the trees and waters I make known my thoughts and charms. I am a fire afar off, a sword laid aside. Those whom I have inspired with love by letting them see me, I have by words undeceived, and if their longings live on hope—and I have given none to Chrysostom or to any other—it cannot justly be said that the death of any is my doing, for it was rather his own obstinacy than my cruelty that killed him; and if it be made a charge against me that his wishes were honourable, and that therefore I was bound to yield to them, I answer that when on this very spot where now his grave is made he declared to me his purity of purpose, I told him that mine was to live in perpetual solitude, and that the earth alone should enjoy the fruits of my retirement and the spoils of my beauty; and if, after this open avowal, he chose to persist against hope and steer against the wind, what wonder is it that he should sink in the depths of his infatuation? If I had encouraged him, I should be false; if I had gratified him, I should have acted against my own better resolution and purpose. He was persistent in spite of warning, he despaired without being hated. Bethink you now if it be reasonable that his suffering should be laid to my charge. Let him who has been deceived complain, let him give way to despair whose encouraged hopes have proved vain, let him flatter himself whom I shall entice, let him boast whom I shall receive; but let not him call me cruel or homicide to whom I make no promise, upon whom I practise no deception, whom I neither entice nor receive. It has not been so far the will of Heaven that I should love by fate, and to expect me to love by choice is idle. Let this general declaration serve for each of my suitors on his own account, and let it be understood from this time forth that if anyone dies for me it is not of jealousy or misery he dies, for she who loves no one can give no cause for jealousy to any, and candour is not to be confounded with scorn. Let him who calls me wild beast and basilisk, leave me alone as something noxious and evil; let him who calls me ungrateful, withhold his service; who calls me wayward, seek not my acquaintance; who calls me cruel, pursue me not; for this wild beast, this basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, wayward being has no kind of desire to seek, serve, know, or follow them. If Chrysostom’s impatience and violent passion killed him, why should my modest behaviour and circumspection be blamed? If I preserve my purity in the society of the trees, why should he who would have me preserve it among men, seek to rob me of it? I have, as you know, wealth of my own, and I covet not that of others; my taste is for freedom, and I have no relish for constraint; I neither love nor hate anyone; I do not deceive this one or court that, or trifle with one or play with another. The modest converse of the shepherd girls of these hamlets and the care of my goats are my recreations; my desires are bounded by these mountains, and if they ever wander hence it is to contemplate the beauty of the heavens, steps by which the soul travels to its primeval abode.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
************

AllenD’s Dreams –
Do Dreams Come True?
If so,
Here are 4 of mine…

Before I tell the world about these dreams of mine…

Let’s Start this *Dream Blog* with a YouTube Dream Song! by Robert Goulet, some YouTube Dream Songs! by Luther Vandross, and some words of wisdom by Don Quixote…

Robert Goulet “The Impossible Dream” A Tribute To 911

My First Dream Relates to the Following Great Bill Withers Song!

bill withers ain’t no sunshine when she’s gone
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIdIqbv7SPo

*************

My Second Dream Relates to having a Team that is working together! Not Only Over the Internet, but face to face too!

My SECOND Dream ALSO relates to San Francisco! and the tight timeframe we have to start the First Internet Woodstock! Called iROCK4FREEDOM!!!

It takes a few songs to cover this one!

Queen & Annie Lennox & David Bowie – Under Pressure – HD

Lyrics…

Bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah
Bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah

Pressure, pushing down on me
Pressing down on you, no man ask for
Under pressure, that burns a building down
Splits a family in two
Puts people on streets

Bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah
Bah, bah, bah, bah, bah, bah

That’s o-kay
It’s the terror of knowing
What this world is about
Watching some good friends
Screaming `Let me out’
Pray tomorrow takes me higher
Pressure on people, people on streets

Doh doh doh bah bah bah bah
O-kay
Chipping around, kick my brains around the floor
These are the days it never rains but it pours
People on streets, people on streets

It’s the terror of knowing
What this world is about,
Watching some good friends
Screaming `Let me out’
Pray tomorrow takes me higher
Pressure on people, people on streets

Turned away from it all, like a blind man
Sat on a fence but it don’t work
Keep coming up with love
But it’s so slashed and torn
Why why why?
Love love love love

Insanity laughs, under pressure we’re cracking
Can’t we give ourselves one more chance
Why can’t we give love one more chance
Why can’t we give love, give love, give love, give love, give love

Cause love’s such an old fashioned word
And love dares you to care
For the people on the edge of the night
And love dares you to change our way of
Caring about ourselves

This is our last dance (x2)
This is ourselves
Under pressure
Under pressure
Pressure

[end of lyrics for Under Pressure by David Bowie]

Dwight Yoakam – “Let’s Work Together” (1990)

CANNED HEAT – LETS WORK TOGETHER (LETS STICK TOGETHER) LYRICS
Artist: Canned Heat Lyrics
Popularity: 12 users have visited this page this week.
Date: Added(Last modified) at 6:54 am October 07, 2012.

Together we’ll stand
Divided we’ll fall
Come on now people
Let’s get on the ball
And work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
(Now now people)
Because together we will stand
Every boy, every girl and man
People, when things go wrong
As they sometimes will
And the road you travel
It stays all uphill
Let’s work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
You know together we will stand
Every boy, girl, woman and man
Oh well now, two or three minutes
Two or three hours
What does it matter now
In this life of ours
Let’s work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
(Now now people)
Because together we will stand
Every boy, every woman and man
Ahhh, come on now
Ahhh, come on, let’s work together
Well now, make someone happy
Make someone smile
Let’s all work together
And make life worthwhile
Let’s work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
(Now now people)
Because together we will stand
Every boy, girl, woman and man
Oh well now, come on you people
Walk hand in hand
Let’s make this world of ours
A good place to stand
And work together
Come on, come on
Let’s work together
(Now now people)
Because together we will stand
Every boy, girl, woman and man
Well now together we will stand
Every boy, girl, woman and man

*************

My Third Dream relates to San Francisco!

It takes a few songs to cover this one 2!

Tony Bennett – I left my heart in San Francisco

Scott McKenzie – San Francisco

>>>

Pete Seeger: Where Have All the Flowers Gone?

Uploaded on Feb 18, 2008
On July 26, 1956, the House of Representatives voted 373 to 9 to cite Pete Seeger and seven others (including playwright Arthur Miller) for contempt, as they failed to cooperate with House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) in their attempts to investigate alleged subversives and communists. Pete Seeger testified before the HUAC in 1955.
In one of Pete’s darkest moments, when his personal freedom, his career, and his safety were in jeopardy, a flash of inspiration ignited this song. The song was stirred by a passage from Mikhail Sholokhov’s novel “And Quie Flows the Don”. Around the world the song traveled and in 1962 at a UNICEF concert in Germany, Marlene Dietrich, Academy Award-nominated German-born American actress, first performed the song in French, as “Qui peut dire ou vont les fleurs?” Shortly after she sang it in German. The song’s impact in Germany just after WWII was shattering. It’s universal message, “let there be peace in the world” did not get lost in its translation. To the contrary, the combination of the language, the setting, and the great lyrics has had a profound effect on people all around the world. May it have the same effect today and bring renewed awareness to all that hear it.

************

My Final Dream for today relates to John Lennon’s classic song called “Imagine”…

Imagine Live – John Lennon – 72

Imagine there’s no heaven
It’s easy if you try
No hell below us
Above us only sky
Imagine all the people living for today

Imagine there’s no countries
It isn’t hard to do
Nothing to kill or die for
And no religion too
Imagine all the people living life in peace

You, you may say
I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will be as one

Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world

You, you may say
I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one
I hope some day you’ll join us
And the world will live as one

Writer: Lennon, John

Lyrics © EMI Music Publishing, Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group

Conclusion
The Transfer of Power In America from the Corporations, the Mafia, the NWO Agenda folks, and the Corrupt United States Federal Government to either…
The Mafia and the People Working together (our best alternative)…
Or to the People without the Mafia’s Collaboration and help (our 2nd best alternative)…
Is going to happen One Way or the Other and soon!
Why should this Inevitable Transfer of Power in America involve violence?
It is Certainly Not the People’s Wish that violence be a part of this.
But we will not be denied! Our Human Right to True Freedom!
iROCK4FREEDOM! in San Francisco! this July!
Be there!
SmokeMaster AllenD and his heroic WordPress Collaborative Team!
Some Don Quixote Quotes

Some Notable Quotes by the Man from La Mancha! from GoodReads.com

Don QuixoteDon Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra
60,200 ratings, 3.79 average rating, 2,632 reviews
buy a copy

Don Quixote Quotes (showing 1-30 of 89)
“Finally, from so little sleeping and so much reading, his brain dried up and he went completely out of his mind.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“All I know is that while I’m asleep, I’m never afraid, and I have no hopes, no struggles, no glories — and bless the man who invented sleep, a cloak over all human thought, food that drives away hunger, water that banishes thirst, fire that heats up cold, chill that moderates passion, and, finally, universal currency with which all things can be bought, weight and balance that brings the shepherd and the king, the fool and the wise, to the same level. There’s only one bad thing about sleep, as far as I’ve ever heard, and that is that it resembles death, since there’s very little difference between a sleeping man and a corpse”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quijote de La Mancha
“Es natural condición de las mujeres desdeñar a quien las quiere y amar a quien las aborrece”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quijote de La Mancha
“I know who I am and who I may be, if I choose.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote de La Mancha, Vol 1
“El que lee mucho y anda mucho, ve mucho y sabe mucho.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraEl Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha
“Thou hast seen nothing yet.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“There is no book so bad…that it does not have something good in it.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Destiny guides our fortunes more favorably than we could have expected. Look there, Sancho Panza, my friend, and see those thirty or so wild giants, with whom I intend to do battle and kill each and all of them, so with their stolen booty we can begin to enrich ourselves. This is nobel, righteous warfare, for it is wonderfully useful to God to have such an evil race wiped from the face of the earth.”
“What giants?” Asked Sancho Panza.
“The ones you can see over there,” answered his master, “with the huge arms, some of which are very nearly two leagues long.”
“Now look, your grace,” said Sancho, “what you see over there aren’t giants, but windmills, and what seems to be arms are just their sails, that go around in the wind and turn the millstone.”
“Obviously,” replied Don Quijote, “you don’t know much about adventures.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Remember that there are two kinds of beauty: one of the soul and the other of the body. That of the soul displays its radiance in intelligence, in chastity, in good conduct, in generosity, and in good breeding, and all these qualities may exist in an ugly man. And when we focus our attention upon that beauty, not upon the physical, love generally arises with great violence and intensity. I am well aware that I am not handsome, but I also know that I am not deformed, and it is enough for a man of worth not to be a monster for him to be dearly loved, provided he has those spiritual endowments I have spoken of.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote Part 1 Of 2
“There were no embraces, because where there is great love there is often little display of it.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Hunger is the best sauce in the world.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Demasiada cordura puede ser la peor de las locuras, ver la vida como es y no como debería de ser.Too much sanity may be madness. And maddest of all, to see life as it is and not as it should be.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“For neither good nor evil can last for ever; and so it follows that as evil has lasted a long time, good must now be close at hand.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“A bad year and a bad month to all the backbiting bitches in the world!…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Virtue is persecuted by the wicked more than it is loved by the good.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“… he who’s down one day can be up the next, unless he really wants to stay in bed, that is…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“I do not deny that what happened to us is a thing worth laughing at. But it is not worth telling, for not everyone is sufficiently intelligent to be able to see things from the right point of view.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Truly I was born to be an example of misfortune, and a target at which the arrows of adversary are aimed.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“What man can pretend to know the riddle of a woman’s mind?”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Here lies a gentleman bold
Who was so very brave
He went to lengths untold,
And on the brink of the gave
Death had on him no hold.
By the world he set small store–
He frightened it to the core–
Yet somehow, by Fate’s plan,
Though he’d lived a crazy man,
When he died he was sane once more.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Translating from one language to another, unless it is from Greek and Latin, the queens of all languages, is like looking at Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, for although the figures are visible, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and cannot be seen with the smoothness and color of the right side.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“The wounds received in battle bestow honor, they do not take it away…”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“It’s up to brave hearts, sir, to be patient when things are going badly, as well as being happy when they’re going well … For I’ve heard that what they call fortune is a flighty woman who drinks too much, and, what’s more, she’s blind, so she can’t see what she’s doing, and she doesn’t know who she’s knocking over or who she’s raising up.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“All of that is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but we cannot all be friars, and God brings His children to heaven by many paths: chivalry is a religion, and there are sainted knights in Glory.’Yes,’ responded Sancho, ‘but I’ve heard that there are more friars in heaven than knights errant.’That is true,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘because the number of religious is greater than the number of knights.’There are many who are errant,’ said Sancho.Many,’ responded Don Quixote, ‘but few who deserve to be called knights.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Muchos son los andantes,” dijo Sancho.
Muchos,” respondió don Quijote, “pero pocos los que merecen nombre de caballeros.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraEl Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de La Mancha
“I was born free, and that I might live in freedom I chose the solitude of the fields; in the trees of the mountains I find society, the clear waters of the brooks are my mirrors, and to the trees and waters I make known my thoughts and charms. I am a fire afar off, a sword laid aside. Those whom I have inspired with love by letting them see me, I have by words undeceived, and if their longings live on hope—and I have given none to Chrysostom or to any other—it cannot justly be said that the death of any is my doing, for it was rather his own obstinacy than my cruelty that killed him; and if it be made a charge against me that his wishes were honourable, and that therefore I was bound to yield to them, I answer that when on this very spot where now his grave is made he declared to me his purity of purpose, I told him that mine was to live in perpetual solitude, and that the earth alone should enjoy the fruits of my retirement and the spoils of my beauty; and if, after this open avowal, he chose to persist against hope and steer against the wind, what wonder is it that he should sink in the depths of his infatuation? If I had encouraged him, I should be false; if I had gratified him, I should have acted against my own better resolution and purpose. He was persistent in spite of warning, he despaired without being hated. Bethink you now if it be reasonable that his suffering should be laid to my charge. Let him who has been deceived complain, let him give way to despair whose encouraged hopes have proved vain, let him flatter himself whom I shall entice, let him boast whom I shall receive; but let not him call me cruel or homicide to whom I make no promise, upon whom I practise no deception, whom I neither entice nor receive. It has not been so far the will of Heaven that I should love by fate, and to expect me to love by choice is idle. Let this general declaration serve for each of my suitors on his own account, and let it be understood from this time forth that if anyone dies for me it is not of jealousy or misery he dies, for she who loves no one can give no cause for jealousy to any, and candour is not to be confounded with scorn. Let him who calls me wild beast and basilisk, leave me alone as something noxious and evil; let him who calls me ungrateful, withhold his service; who calls me wayward, seek not my acquaintance; who calls me cruel, pursue me not; for this wild beast, this basilisk, this ungrateful, cruel, wayward being has no kind of desire to seek, serve, know, or follow them. If Chrysostom’s impatience and violent passion killed him, why should my modest behaviour and circumspection be blamed? If I preserve my purity in the society of the trees, why should he who would have me preserve it among men, seek to rob me of it? I have, as you know, wealth of my own, and I covet not that of others; my taste is for freedom, and I have no relish for constraint; I neither love nor hate anyone; I do not deceive this one or court that, or trifle with one or play with another. The modest converse of the shepherd girls of these hamlets and the care of my goats are my recreations; my desires are bounded by these mountains, and if they ever wander hence it is to contemplate the beauty of the heavens, steps by which the soul travels to its primeval abode.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
“Do you see over yonder, friend Sancho, thirty or forty hulking giants? I intend to do battle with them and slay them.”
― Miguel de Cervantes SaavedraDon Quixote
************

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